Thursday, December 3, 2009

ADVENT COUNTDOWN 23

This is the month, and this the happy morn
Wherein the Son of Heav'n's eternal King
Of wedded Maid, and Virgin Mother born,
Our great redemption from above did bring;
For so the holy sage did once sing,
That he our deadly forfeit should release,
And with his Father work us a perpetual peace.
—John Milton,
"On the Morning of Christ's Nativity"
———————
[The word "Advent" comes from the Latin adventus, which means "coming." In the Christian church Advent is that period of expectant waiting leading up to the Nativity of Jesus. Some prefer to think of it as a "Countdown to Christmas." If you've ever had an Advent calendar, you know that each day prior to Christmas has it own window, usually hidden behind a little flap or door, behind which is a scene or verse from the Scriptures. I thought it would be fun to take that idea and post a daily photo with a bit of text below—a stanza or two from a Christmas poem or a few lines of prose from a favorite Christmas story. The photos aren't intended to be tied with the text. Some are just ones I meant to run with a post this past year, but for whatever reason, didn't. To set these posts apart from my regular—or irregular!—ones, I've given them a different typeface and look.]

20 comments:

Wanda said...

Enjoyed the poem on this cold wet morning. Hope you are still feeling better and can see, for it may snow!

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Wanda…

I am feeling much better…though the eyes are still something of a problem, but not nearly so bad as yesterday.

I've been out, fed the ducks and birds, and I believe it could snow given only a slight drop in temperature. It's getting about that time hereabouts, after all. And frankly, I won't mind seeing a few flakes.

Bonnie, Original Art Studio said...

Lovely words and image Scribe. Isn't blogging an amazing vehicle whereby even when we are ill we can still make a contribution to the lives of others? A contribution that can be felt immediately by those who tune in.

Hope your eyes clear up and that you are feeling full of energy again soon.

(If you can't get out to shop, you can make some lovely gifts (books, calendars, etc.) with your files of amazing photographs by going to websites like Shutterfly or Snapfish - while you recuperate at home. - Just a thought.)

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Bonnie…

Blogging, and in fact the Internet in general, is indeed amazing. It is a good thing, however, that I had several days of this Advent countdown ready to go beforehand—there were times there when keeping up would have be serious;y difficult.

I'm feeling a lot better today, thank you—and my eyes, while not back to normal, are sure not as messed up as they were. So I think (knock on wood) the worst is over.

BTW, you'll note the comments problem from yesterday cured itself somehow—reappearing magically some hours later.

FireLight said...

Good morning Grizzled! Thank you so much for stopping by and for your response to my query. It seems from context that it should
mean that the man who has ridden his horse across the waters of the Clyde River is quite tired out...
But I will study your explanantion more closely, and think it through again.
I have stopped by here a few times...this morning I really love your post today.
Sunday night, I read for our Lessons & Carols service at my church. I do so love this season of Advent!
Peace be with you.

Gail said...

HI GRIZZ-

Lovely. :-)


hope you are on the mend. That was quite a detailed description of "what has been aiiing you". I do believe that is a "guy thing" to be so descriptive about body fluids and the like!! I have a clear understanding!! :-) I do hope all that stuff in your eyes is clearing up - Good Lord!!!

I believe your illness has added a new and unique persepective on the whole Advent experience.

Love to you
ail
peace.....

FireLight said...

Did that work?

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

FireLight…

As I said, it was at best a guess based on the fact those words from that single line COULD apply in that context. But you're more likely to have it right, I expect.

I love this entire season—from Advent through Twelfth-Night. (Actually, from Thanksgiving through Easter.)

Whether you stop by the riverbank silently or leave a comment, know you're always welcome.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Gail…

I am on the mend. And hey, I thought I was being rather circumspect about my descriptions…why I could have said something like "eye snot" or "tear-duct tapioca" and really grossed you out. But, no, I'm more refined than that. :-)

As to such matters being more a "guy thing," I say, HA! I've been around too many women whose candid and unexpurgated conversations made me want to hide under the dinner table or leave the room. We men have absolutely nothing on you gals in that respect!

My bug attack has certainly made my entire week—from before Thanksgiving to today—a memorable first-quarter Advent experience.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

FireLight…

It did, I think. Didn't it?

The Weaver of Grass said...

Loved this one too Scribe. My favourite Christmas carol is Adam lay bounden - dare I hope it might feature one day.

Bernie said...

So glad your feeling better, now let's hope your eyes clear up soon.
Loved the poem and of course the photo Grizz.....:-) Hugs

Robin said...

I'm so glad you're feeling better!

TheChicGeek said...

Hi Scribe :)
Beautiful post. I've been enjoying your advent series. You have had some really beautiful quotes and some authors that I have not read before so it's been nice to have the introduction. I love the time of Advent too. It's always so nice to remember the true reason for the season!

I'm glad you're feeling better too :)

Have a Cozy Evening :) Hugs :)
Kelly

Hildred and Charles said...

Griz, you were commenting that you didn't know any Advent hymns. One of my favourites is 'Lo, He comes with Clouds Descending' - the words are written by John Cennick 1750, revised by Charles Wesley in 1758 and then once again by Martin Madan in 1769. The music is an 18th century English melody. It is quite majestic and joyful - I love playing it on the organ. Thank you for your daily Advent thoughts and pictures....

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Weaver…

Sorry to be slow in replying…my eyes became really messed up yesterday evening to the point I couldn't read anything on the computer screen, let alone write back.

You know, I'm not familiar with the carol/words of Adam lay y-bouden, and when I've tried to look it up on the Internet, all I've found are CDs with that carol on them—not the verses. I believe some can be sampled/played. If I can listen well enough to copy them out, or locate the lyrics somewhere, I'd be happy to put them up; I figure if it's your favorite carol, the words have to be worth sharing. So, give me some time to see what I can find or come up with.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Bernie…

Well, I'm feeling pretty good—still coughing a bit and throat's somewhat sore, but nothing compared to last week and I'm sure not complaining. The eyes, however, are still giving me problems. Time, I suppose, is the needed medicine.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Robin…

Me, too. While there are times when a good sick can be like a forced vacation—a fine excuse to lay in bed and snooze and read for a few days—now, in the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas, is not that time.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Kelly (CG)…

The older I get, the more I wish we could learn to take such celebrations and remember the reasons—the traditions and history and sometimes the scared wonder behind all the hoopla—that makes it important, worth keeping and observing. Instead, we always seem to gravitate towards making it about showing off and spending money; we commercialize our most scared times, and in so so doing, lose our ability to appreciate the gift of holy times.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Hildred and Charles …

I'll find that hymn you mentioned on one of the Web sites where you can hear the melody played—read the lyrics—for hundreds of hymns. I often visit these various listings and go through a dozen or two unfamiliar hymns. I wouldn't be surprised if I also have a copy of it in one of my old hymnals.

Thank you.