Tuesday, December 1, 2009

ADVENT COUNTDOWN 25

The feet of the humblest may walk in the field
Where the feet of the Holiest trod,
This, then, is the marvel to mortals revealed,
When the silvery trumpets of Christmas have pealed,
That mankind are the children of God.
—Phillips Brooks, "Christmas Carol"
———————
[The word "Advent" comes from the Latin adventus, which means "coming." In the Christian church Advent is that period of expectant waiting leading up to the Nativity of Jesus. Some prefer to think of it as a "Countdown to Christmas." If you've ever had an Advent calendar, you know that each day prior to Christmas has it own window, usually hidden behind a little flap or door, behind which is a scene or verse from the Scriptures. I thought it would be fun to take that idea and post a daily photo with a bit of text below—a stanza or two from a Christmas poem or a few lines of prose from a favorite Christmas story. The photos aren't intended to be tied with the text. Some are just ones I meant to run with a post this past year, but for whatever reason, didn't. To set these posts apart from my regular—or irregular!—ones, I've given them a different typeface and look.]

12 comments:

Bonnie, Original Art Studio said...

Lovely.

Wanda said...

Beautiful photo and verse...makes me want to go walk in my field!!!

Carolyn H said...

Griz: as requested, my family's apple crisp recipe:

For the "crisp": Work together until crumbly 3/4 c flour, 1 cup sugar, 1/3 cup butter or margarine (softened slightly to make mixing easier)

For the apples: Use a cooking apple, but not one that's impossible to eat on its own. I used Jonathan this time and it was excellent. Don't use red or yellow delicious. Peel, core and slice thin 2 cups of the chosen apples.

Layer apples in a thin layer on bottom of pan. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup water, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp salt. Top with crumb mixture. Bake at 350, uncovered, about 40 minutes.

Recipe allegedly serves 6. Don't believe it unless you have a table of supermodels who never eat anything. Tastes great warm with ice cream. Can also be made with hard pears. Recipe can easily be doubled if you use a larger pan.

Carolyn H

Gail said...

HI GRIZZ-

beautiful picture - lovely words - wonderful YOU!!!

Love Gail
peace.....

The Weaver of Grass said...

I have never heard that lovely verse before - very beautiful. I now begin to look forward to visiting your blog each day, to see what new snippet of Christmas verse you have chosen.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Bonnie…

I think so, too.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Wanda…

Sounds like a plenty good enough excuse to me…walk!

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Carolyn…

Thank you so much for sharing this. It sounds absolutely wonderful. I love the old recipes using the basics found in any country kitchen. These came from the days of good cooks who relied on home-grown ingredients and skill—and I like to think a dash of love—to produce delicious dishes.

I promise I will will make this soon and let you know…but I can tell you already I'm going to like it.

Again, thank you.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Weaver…

I'm one of those who keeps a notebook (notebooks, actually) of quotes and verses, bits of prose that I like. Plus I have dozens of Christmas and seasonal books.

I guarantee you'll know tomorrow's bit.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Gail…

Thank you, always…thank you.

Hildred and Charles said...

Beautiful text.

Are you feeling better?

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Hildred and Charles…

It is lovely text, I think

Unfortunately, I'm sort of feeling better but doing worse. I know that doesn't make any sense. But I'm writing a post and will explain. (Give me about a half hour, or a bit more, and check back.)